[SOLVED] Unable to Sign-In to Gmail with Thunderbird with OAuth2, Keeps Asking for Email or Phone Over and Over

If you are setting up Thunderbird to use your Gmail account you may find that when Thunderbird opens a new window to a Google web portal into which you are to provide your email address and password that it will keep asking you over and over again for your email and never enable to you to enter the password.

This occurs when Thunderbird’s privacy settings do not allow it to store cookies.

First, ensure that your gmail account has Allow Continue reading “[SOLVED] Unable to Sign-In to Gmail with Thunderbird with OAuth2, Keeps Asking for Email or Phone Over and Over”

Mocking an HTTPS RESTful endpoint with Netcat

Netcat is generally known as a TCP/IP Swiss Army Knife and is incredibly helpful for both debugging and mocking up network services

Following is an example on how to setup a mock RESTful service that communicates over HTTPS.

On the “server” side, run the following command.  The -l command instructs Netcat to listen.

while true; do { echo -e “HTTP/1.1 200 OK\r\n$(date)\r\n\r\n<h1>hello world from $(hostname) on $(date)</h1>” |  nc -vl –ssl 8080; } done

On the “client” side, run the → Continue reading “Mocking an HTTPS RESTful endpoint with Netcat”

Using netcat to Mock a RESTful Webservice that Returns JSON

Let’s say that you are working on a part of a project that needs to consume some JSON data from a forthcoming HTTP service.  That sub-system is being developed by one of your colleagues and is not yet ready for you to stand-up to develop against.

You can use netcat to mock the webservice and return some static JSON data for which you can develop and test against with a simple one-liner.

First, put together your JSON in a file, → Continue reading “Using netcat to Mock a RESTful Webservice that Returns JSON”

How to Use Credentials That Contain Special Characters with curl

In order to execute curl commands to endpoints with passwords that contain special characters, the cleanest way that I have found to do so is to Base64 encode the authentication string for curl and then pass an Authorization request header along with the request.

In this example the credentials are uid ‘rchapin’ and passwd ‘abc123!@#’.  Normally we would pass this to curl as follows:

$ curl -u rchapin:abc123!@# -X GET https://some-endpoint:443

However, this will not work and the password will → Continue reading “How to Use Credentials That Contain Special Characters with curl”

[SOLVED] Configuring chrooted bind and rndc-confgen Hangs Not Generating a Key

I am putting together a chrooted installation of named and ran into a problem whereby attempting to generate an rndc.key with rndc-confgen just hangs, never returning and not generating a key.

After doing some searching I discovered that I needed to run the command as follows:

rndc-confgen -a -r /dev/urandom  -t /var/named/chroot

Which outputs the following, generating the key file that I expected.

wrote key file "/etc/rndc.key"
wrote key file "/var/named/chroot/etc/rndc.key"

Continue reading “[SOLVED] Configuring chrooted bind and rndc-confgen Hangs Not Generating a Key”

Installing Chrome Extensions Without Signing in With a Google Account

Google requires that you login with a Google account before you can install any Chrome extensions.

The following is how to install an extension without logging in (under Windows.  The same should work under Linux and Mac):

  1. Find the ID for the extension.  When you browse the extension in the store you will see a URL similar to the following:  https://chrome.google.com/webstore/detail/cookies/iphcomljdfghbkdcfndaijbokpgddeno?hl=en.   The hash string after the ‘cookies’ string (the name of the extension) up to the ? is the
Continue reading “Installing Chrome Extensions Without Signing in With a Google Account”

How to Pick a Domain Name

A domain name is an alphanumeric string of characters that identifies individual websites and e-mail addresses on the Internet. It must be less than 63 characters in length, not including the characters in the TLD (Top Level Domain) suffix (.com, .net, etc.). A TLD suffix is a part of all domain names and indicates the type of organization for a given domain. Following is a list of common TLDs:

  • com: commercial businesses
  • net: organizations involved with Internet infrastructure (ISPs
Continue reading “How to Pick a Domain Name”

FaceBook Allows 3rd Party Advertisers to Use Your Photos Without Your Permission

or, how to modify your setting such that your content is better protected.

kdawson posted an article on Slashdot about the fact that FaceBook is allowing third party advertisers to use your photos in their ads. The article also includes a link to an article about how to modify your settings so that your photos don’t show up.

Here is how to make the change:

Go to: Settings -> Privacy -> News Feed and Wall -> Facebook Ads Continue reading “FaceBook Allows 3rd Party Advertisers to Use Your Photos Without Your Permission”

The Nuts and Bolts of Domain Name Ownership

That’s not to say that the proper care and feeding of a domain is overly complex. But before we get into the those details let’s go over some core domain related terminology:

  • IP Address:  A unique numerical address for a server that hosts any Internet service.
  • DNS: Which stands for “Domain Name System.” The primary purpose of DNS is to make it easy for people to access web pages and send e-mails.  DNS translates a given domain name into the
Continue reading “The Nuts and Bolts of Domain Name Ownership”